Tag Archives: circle

What’s Your Angle? SOLC 2019 Day 21

When was the last time you used a protractor?  Drawn a circle?  Measured an angle? We spent time earlier this week doing all of those things in my classroom.  There’s nothing like a new tool to pique students interest…and the protractor did just that.  Students were fascinated that protractors also have rulers on them, they couldn’t wait to experiment with them!

We used those protractors to draw a half circle on the fold and then open the full 360 degrees of circle.  Each student then had to measure an angle–one randomly assigned–and cut that angle out of the circle.  The cut out angle became the mouth of an “angle fish,” the piece removed became the caudal fin.  Some designing soon resulted in a whole school of individual angle fish!

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Why bother with angles and protractors?  Simply for a cute crafts project?  You probably know me better than that.  My students are just beginning to pay attention to angles, to recognize those perfect square corners that measure 90 degree.  To understand that triangles exist that are not perfectly equilateral, with equal angles as well.  They are starting to understand that attributes can categorize without diminishing the diversity of possibilities within those categories.

I hope geometry lessons can teach ideas that transfer far beyond polygons, sides, and angles.  I want my students to recognize that each of us brings our experiences, genetics, family backgrounds, and opinions to who we are.  That they will learn to see diversity and difference as opportunities to enrich their own experiences, to add value to our world, to push beyond their own status quo.  That they will step outside the comfort zone of sameness, and consider the view from another perspective.

I’m pretty sure my students understand the categories of acute, right, and obtuse angles…the rest will continue to be a work in progress.  After all, I’m still working out my angles too.

 

Coming Full Circle: Day 30

It’s been 30 days.  A poem and a post each day of the month of April.  I’ve fallen into a rhythm, finding spaces for the writing, surfacing ideas for poetry and posts.  I know this about myself, the habit of writing makes writing easier for me (not necessarily better, but easier).  So what will happen tomorrow?  Will I write anyway?

I was drawn to a photo of a circle today and the idea of a circle.  No beginning, no end.  Maybe the perfect metaphor for the 30th day of the 30-day poetry challenge.

circle

Circle

 

Never-ending curve

beginning and end

indistinguishable

blended

whole

a hole?

Spots and blots

polka dots

rounded

rounding up

containing

all 360 degrees

Cycle

repeating

birth and death

water

air

never-ending curve

begins

where it ends

Circle

 

Douillard 2018

My students are busily curating their poems, selecting about 10 poems to publish in their own books.  They are working to revise and refine…and the poems are gaining depth as they try out new techniques and experiment with form and line breaks.

Here’s one Stone wrote about an engineer who was an accidental paleontologist!

The Secret Engineer

Deep deep underground was a secret engineer.
He never told anyone he saw a dinosaur
because he built a time machine.
There was a hot and blazing sun with loads of heat.
He was in the prehistoric time
He was the best mathematician, he made the best discovery.
With his engineering mind and his scientific brain his inventions were the
Best!

Stone

Rylan has been writing poems about softball.

Will She Swing?

 

Yellow with red stripes

resting in a leather open oval

waiting anxiously for the umpire to call out

STRIKE!

Fastball

Change up

Drop ball

Will she swing?

Rylan

And Sadie revised her poem about fire’s evil plot

Fire Plot

The fire hisses and cracks in its pen amongst the burnt and crisp logs.

Its angry arms reach up into the umber sky,

then shrivels down.

The fire sneaks up on pieces of marshmallow fluff, thinking of a plot to escape from the charred black pit and leap into the world.

Maybe to a hillside or a house, spreading fiery anger and sadness with it.

When it discovers the perfect scheme, it crackles and reaches into the dark, sending a swirl of smoke into the starry night.

Sadie

As April ends so does National Poetry Month. I know the power that poetry has on writers and thinkers and learners.  The sustained attention that results from 30-days of writing also has power.  I’m thinking about other ways to stoke the fires of writing for my students and myself, establishing a firm practice of writing that will take us beyond the end of the school year.  Wish me luck!